Innovation


Restarting and Reinventing School: Learning in the Time of COVID and Beyond – Report from the Learning Policy Institute – Linda Darling-Hammond et al


Click Here for the Full Report

Executive Summary of this 126 page PDF Report

Across the United States, state education agencies and school districts face daunting challenges and
difficult decisions for restarting schools as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. As state and district
leaders prepare for what schooling will look like in 2020 and beyond, there is an opportunity to
identify evidence-based policies and practices that will enable them to seize this moment to rethink
school in ways that can transform learning opportunities for students and teachers alike.
Our current system took shape almost exactly a century ago, when school designs and funding were
established to implement mass education on an assembly-line model organized to prepare students
for their “places in life”—judgments that were enacted within contexts of deep-seated racial, ethnic,
economic, and cultural prejudices. In a historical moment when we have more knowledge about
human development and learning, when society and the economy demand a more challenging set
of skills, and when—at least in our rhetoric—there is a greater social commitment to equitable
education, it is time to use the huge disruptions caused by this pandemic to reinvent our systems
of education. The question is: How we can harness these understandings as we necessarily redesign
school? How can we transform what has not been working for children and for our society into a
more equitable and empowering future?
This report provides an overarching framework that focuses on how policymakers as well as
educators can support equitable, effective teaching and learning regardless of the medium
through which that takes place. This framework provides research, state and local examples, and
policy recommendations in 10 key areas that speak both to transforming learning and to closing
opportunity and achievement gaps. It illustrates how policymakers and educators can:

  1. Close the digital divide
  2. Strengthen distance and blended learning
  3. Assess what students need
  4. Ensure supports for social and emotional learning
  5. Redesign schools for stronger relationships
  6. Emphasize authentic, culturally responsive learning
  7. Provide expanded learning time
  8. Establish community schools and wraparound supports
  9. Prepare educators for reinventing school
  10. Leverage more adequate and equitable school funding

    Each of these 10 policy priorities will help schools reinvent themselves around principles of equity,
    authentic learning, and stronger relationships, and they require shifts from policymakers and
    educators alike.

Recent Discussion of Pandemic Education Issues in the Media

Hawaii schools superintendent Christina Kishimoto stepping down in July when contract ends, March 19, 2021 Honolulu Star Advertiser

Did Unions’ Lack of Support Spell Trouble for School Superintendent? March 23, 2021 Civil Beat

Educators Worry About Kids With No Computers As Online Classes Start. April 5, 2020, Civil Beat

Civil Beat’s Virtual Education Event Digs Into Distance Learning July 20, 2020. Panel Discussion, Civil Beat

The First Grades Of The New School Year Are In — And Hawaii’s Students Are Struggling Dec 9, 2020, Civil Beat

Instructors For Hire: How The Pandemic Is Fueling A New Side Business, Aug 20, 2020, Civil Beat

Restarting and Reinventing School – Learning in the Time of COVID and Beyond

Click for the full report.
See right and below for Executive Summary excerpt

Across the United States, state education agencies and school districts face daunting challenges and
difficult decisions for restarting schools as the COVID-19 pandemic continues.

As state and district leaders prepare for what schooling will look like in 2020 and beyond, there is an opportunity to identify evidence-based policies and practices that will enable them to seize this moment to rethink school in ways that can transform learning opportunities for students and teachers alike.

Our current system took shape almost exactly a century ago, when school designs and funding were established to implement mass education on an assembly-line model organized to prepare students for their “places in life”—judgments that were enacted within contexts of deep-seated racial, ethnic, economic, and cultural prejudices. In a historical moment when we have more knowledge about human development and learning, when society and the economy demand a more challenging set of skills, and when—at least in our rhetoric—there is a greater social commitment to equitable education, it is time to use the huge disruptions caused by this pandemic to reinvent our systems of education.

The question is: How we can harness these understandings as we necessarily redesign school?

How can we transform what has not been working for children and for our society into a more equitable and empowering future?

This report provides an overarching framework that focuses on how policymakers as well as
educators can support equitable, effective teaching and learning regardless of the medium
through which that takes place. This framework provides research, state and local examples, and
policy recommendations in 10 key areas that speak both to transforming learning and to closing
opportunity and achievement gaps. It illustrates how policymakers and educators can:

  1. Close the digital divide
  2. Strengthen distance and blended learning
  3. Assess what students need
  4. Ensure supports for social and emotional learning
  5. Redesign schools for stronger relationships
  6. Emphasize authentic, culturally responsive learning
  7. Provide expanded learning time
  8. Establish community schools and wraparound supports
  9. Prepare educators for reinventing school
  10. Leverage more adequate and equitable school funding

    Each of these 10 policy priorities will help schools reinvent themselves around principles of equity,
    authentic learning, and stronger relationships, and they require shifts from policymakers and
    educators alike.

https://restart-reinvent.learningpolicyinstitute.org/sites/default/files/product-files/Restart_Reinvent_Schools_COVID_REPORT.pdf

Secretary DeVos Announces Student-Centered Grant Awards to Spur Worker Development, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Growth During Coronavirus Recovery | U.S. Department of Education

Secretary DeVos Announces Student-Centered Grant Awards to Spur Worker Development, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Growth During Coronavirus Recovery | U.S. Department of Education
— Read on www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/secretary-devos-announces-student-centered-grant-awards-spur-worker-development-entrepreneurship-and-economic-growth-during-coronavirus-recovery

Compare School-Based, Distance, and Blended Learning

Face to Face, F2F, Onsite, or
School-Based Learning
Virtual, Online, Electronic, or
Distance Learning
Hybrid or
Blended Learning
Onsite – delivered in a school or other facility.Online – video, book, independent study  Instruction.Mixed Online and Onsite Instruction.
Instructor-Led
Instructor-Mediated
or
Self-Contained
Instructor-Led
Synchronous live in-person instruction and  asynchronous Instruction  (homework, labs, study halls, independent study) andAsynchronous lessons and resource work and synchronous instruction and group work live via video or audio.Synchronous live in-person instruction and group work via video, and  asynchronous lessons and resource work.

Digital media lessons and resources including computer assisted learning in labs, at home, or in class– video, audio, text, coding, typing, AI.

Digital media lessons and resources including computer assisted learning at home- video, audio, text, coding, typing, AI.

Digital media lessons and resources including computer assisted learning in labs, at home, or in class– video, audio, text, coding, typing, AI.
Games – in class live games, CB video games. Interaction tools e.g. Top Hat, Kajeet, SeeSaw.Gamification, CB video games. Interaction tools e.g. Top Hat, Kajeet, SeeSaw.Gamification, CB video games. Interaction tools e.g. Top Hat, Kajeet, SeeSaw.
Teacher contact in person
No teacher contact if self contained.

If mediated, teacher contact through email, LMS, or video.
Teacher contact in person, through email, LMS, or video.

Onsite Assessment: teacher/district/or publisher created tests– linear computer based, adaptive, essay, authentic portfolio.

Online Assessment: teacher/district/or publisher created tests– linear computer based, adaptive, essay, authentic portfolio.

Online and Onsite Assessment: teacher/district/or publisher created tests– linear computer based, adaptive, essay, authentic portfolio.